Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy

Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy

Gastrectomy

A vertical sleeve gastrectomy is a restrictive surgery that is performed laparoscopically (through small incisions). The average human stomach can hold 1 to 1.5 liters of food. While in the stomach, food is mixed with digestive enzymes to break down the food to a more simple form, so it can be more easily digested and absorbed in the small bowel.

During a vertical sleeve gastrectomy, a thin vertical sleeve is created by using a stapling device. This sleeve will typically hold between 50 and 150ml or is about the size of a banana. The excised portion of the stomach is removed.

By altering the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract, sleeve gastrectomy changes signals in the body, resulting in decreased hunger and increased feelings of fullness after meals. The bile and pancreatic fluid from the liver and pancreas mix with the food and allow it to be completely digested and absorbed in the bowel. There is no rerouting of the small bowel or post-operative adjustments needed for this surgery.

Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

Gastric Bypass

Gastric bypass is a restrictive and malabsorptive surgery, which can be performed laparoscopically (through small incisions). A small stomach pouch is created using a stapling device.

The small intestine is separated into two sections. The lower portion of the small intestine is attached to the newly created stomach pouch. This allows food to pass directly into the small intestine where digestion continues. The upper portion of the small intestine is reconnected to the lower part of the intestine.

The bile and pancreatic fluids from the liver and pancreas allow food to be completely digested. By altering the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract, gastric bypass changes signals in the body, resulting in decreased hunger and increased feelings of fullness after meals.

Laparoscopic Gastric Banding

Laparoscopic Gastric Banding

Gastric Banding

Gastric banding is a restrictive surgery that is performed laparoscopically (through small incisions). It is the least invasive procedure out of bariatric surgery options and requires an implanted medical device.

In preparation for the band, a tunnel is created behind the stomach. The band is introduced to the abdomen through a trocar. The band is positioned around the upper portion of the stomach and then secured using the locking mechanism, a tube attached to the band will be connected to the injection port. The port is used to adjust the band tightness after surgery.

An incision is made on the upper abdomen to insert the injection port beneath the skin. The tube is secured using the locking connecter on the port. The injection port and tube are placed beneath the skin. The band does not alter your digestive function. Food consumed passes through the digestive tract in the normal route.

Your surgeon may tighten the band by injecting saline into the injection port. As the saline is introduced into the injection port, it travels through the tube to the band. The addition of saline to the band creates a smaller upper stomach pouch. This smaller stomach pouch decreases the amount of food you can eat before feeling full.

*As with all weight-loss procedures, behavior modification and dietary compliance plays a critical part in determining the long-term success of the procedure. All surgery presents risks. Weight, age and medical history determine your specific risks.